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Molecular modeling of the extracellular domain of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase reveals multiple cadherin-like domains and a calcium-binding site.

Authors
  • Anders, J
  • Kjar, S
  • Ibáñez, C F
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Publisher
American Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (ASBMB)
Publication Date
Sep 21, 2001
Volume
276
Issue
38
Pages
35808–35817
Identifiers
PMID: 11445581
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Using bioinformatic tools, mutagenesis, and binding studies, we have investigated the structural organization of the extracellular region of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase, a functional receptor for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Multiple sequence alignments of seven vertebrate sequences and one invertebrate RET sequence delineated four distinct N-terminal domains, each of about 110 residues, containing many of the consensus motifs of the cadherin fold. Based on these alignments and the crystal structures of epithelial and neural cadherins, we have generated molecular models of each of the four cadherin-like domains in the extracellular region of human RET. The modeled structures represent realistic models from both energetic and geometrical points of view and are consistent with previous observations gathered from biochemical analyses of the effects of Hirschsprung's disease mutations affecting the folding and stability of the RET molecule, as well as our own site-directed mutagenesis studies of RET cadherin-like domain 1. We have also investigated the role of Ca(2+) in ligand binding by RET and found that Ca(2+) ions are required for RET binding to GDNF but not for GDNF binding to the GFRalpha1 co-receptor. In agreement with these results, RET, but not GFRalpha1, was found to bind Ca(2+) directly. Our results indicate that the overall architecture of the extracellular region of RET is more closely related to cadherins than previously thought. The models of the cadherin-like domains of human RET represent valuable tools with which to guide future site-directed mutagenesis studies aimed at identifying residues involved in ligand binding and receptor activation.

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