Affordable Access

Molecular interactions between DNA and an aminated glass substrate.

Authors
  • Carré, Alain
  • Lacarrière, Valérie
  • Birch, William
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Colloid and Interface Science
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2003
Volume
260
Issue
1
Pages
49–55
Identifiers
PMID: 12742033
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

With the development of DNA arrays, the immobilization of DNA strands onto solid substrates remains an essential research topic. DNA arrays have potential applications in DNA sequencing, mutation detection, and pathogen identification. DNA bound to solid substrates must still be accessible and retain the ability to hybridize with its complementary strands. One technology to produce these arrays involves linking DNA molecule probes to a silanized substrate in microspot patterns and exposing them to a solution of fluorescently labeled samples of DNA targets. The behavior of both the target and probe DNA and their interactions with each other at the substrate surface, particularly with respect to molecular interactions, are poorly understood at the present time. The objective of this work is to model simply the interface interactions between DNA and glass slides modified with an aminosilane (gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APTS). In aqueous solutions, DNA behaves as a polyacid over a wide range of pH. A glass substrate treated with APTS is positively or negatively charged, depending on the pH. A model of the surface charge of APTS-treated glass has been developed from results of wetting experiments performed at various pH. It has been demonstrated that the surface charge of APTS-treated glass is well described by a model of constant capacitance of the electrical double layer. A good correlation between experimental data on DNA retention at various pH's and the variation of the surface charge of the APTS-treated glass is obtained. This provides an indication of the role of ionic interactions in the adsorption of DNA molecules onto aminated glass slides.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times