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Molecular Identification of Haemadipsa rjukjuana (Hirudiniformes: Haemadipsidae) in Gageo Island, Korea.

Authors
  • Won, Sohyun1
  • Park, Bae Keun2
  • Kim, Baek Jun1
  • Kim, Hye Won1
  • Kang, Jun Gu1
  • Park, Tae Seo3
  • Seo, Hong Yul3
  • Eun, Ye3
  • Kim, Ki Gyoung3
  • Chae, Joon Seok1
  • 1 Laboratory of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Research Institute for Veterinary Science and College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 306-764, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 3 National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon 404-708, Korea. , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Korean journal of parasitology
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2014
Volume
52
Issue
2
Pages
169–175
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3347/kjp.2014.52.2.169
PMID: 24850960
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

There are 60 species of blood-feeding land leeches, 50 species belonging to the family Haemadipsidae and 10 species belonging to the family Xerobdellidae. Despite recent papers on the land leeches, their taxonomic identification is not fully understood, especially at a species level. In Korea, there have been no historical records of the terrestrial leeches, but recently an unrecorded blood-feeding land leech was discovered at Gageo-do (Island), Korea. Molecular analysis was used to identify the species of 29 leeches collected from Mt. Dock-Sil in Gageo-do. Conventional PCR was conducted using nuclear 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) genetic marker. The 18S rRNA sequences revealed that the leeches share 99.9% identity with Haemadipsa rjukjuana (inhabiting Taiwan), and the CO1 sequences revealed that the leeches are very close to H. rjukjuana (inhabiting Taiwan). The CO1 sequences were separated into 2 categories, 1 with 94.6% and the other with 94.3% similarity to the H. rjukjuana L00115A (inhabiting Taiwan). This new finding of the land leech is the first record in Korea. In addition, the north range of the distribution of the blood-feeding leech (Hirudiniformes: Haemadipisidae) should be reconsidered including Korea.

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