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Molecular genetic methods in the veterinary clinical bacteriology laboratory: current usage and future applications.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Animal health research reviews / Conference of Research Workers in Animal Diseases
Publication Date
Volume
4
Issue
2
Pages
73–93
Identifiers
PMID: 15134292
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

In the last 5 years, numerous molecular methods have been published for the detection and characterization of bacteria in the field of veterinary medicine. PCR has been the most commonly used technology. Although not currently used for clinical veterinary diagnosis, new technologies such as liquid-phase hybridization, real-time PCR, pathogen load determination and DNA/protein microarray have been described and have many possible applications in the clinical bacteriology laboratory because of their sensitivity and efficiency. This review describes the basic principles and application of recently published DNA-based molecular techniques for the purpose of veterinary clinical bacteriological diagnosis. It covers advances in probe hybridization technology, DNA/RNA amplification techniques and other molecular detection methods, including 16S rRNA analysis for bacterial characterization and DNA microarrays for bacterial detection. The review briefly summarizes the application of molecular methods for the diagnosis of specific important bacterial infections of animals, and for other animal pathogens that are slow or difficult to isolate in the clinical bacteriology laboratory. In addition, the molecular detection of antimicrobial resistance genes and of bovine mastitis pathogens is briefly described and current commercially available tests are listed.

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