Molecular Evolution of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Metropolitan Area of Cologne, Germany, from 1984 to 1998

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Molecular Evolution of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Metropolitan Area of Cologne, Germany, from 1984 to 1998

Publisher
American Society for Microbiology
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2005
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Education
  • Philosophy
License
Unknown

Abstract

To investigate the molecular evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a large metropolitan area in Germany, 398 nonrepetitive MRSA isolates recovered from patients from various teaching and nonteaching hospitals in Cologne between 1984 and 1998 were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). On this basis, 95 representative isolates were selected and further investigated by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing. Overall, there were 9 MLST types and 16 spa types. The most prevalent sequence types (STs) were ST239 (38% of isolates), ST247 (29%), and ST228 (18%); the most prevalent spa types were 37 (32%) and 51 (29%). ST239 comprised five major PFGE types and various unique PFGE patterns, and ST5 comprised two PFGE types. While the same PFGE pattern was not observed among strains with different STs, spa type 37 was observed among strains representing two different STs (ST239 and ST241), and these belonged to the same clonal complex as single-locus variants. ST239 was the earliest predominant ST, with the highest prevalence from 1984 to 1988 (96%), followed by ST247 from 1989 to 1993 (83%) and ST228 from 1994 to 1998 (40%). Spa type 37 was the most prevalent from 1984 to 1988 (96%), spa type 51 was the most prevalent from 1989 to 1993 (83%), and spa types 1 and 458 were the most prevalent from 1994 to 1998 (26% and 14%, respectively). The prevalence of SCCmec type III decreased from 96% from 1984 to 1988 to 8% from 1989 to 1993, the prevalence of SCCmec type I increased from 4% from 1984 to 1988 to 97% from 1989 to 1993 and decreased to 62% from 1994 to 1998. While the genetic diversity of MRSA increased from 1984 to 1998, one prevalent ST usually accounted for most of the isolates in a given time period.

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