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Molecular detection of Rickettsia amblyommatis and Rickettsia parkeri in ticks collected from wild pigs in Campeche, Mexico.

Authors
  • López-Pérez, Andrés M1
  • Sánchez-Montes, Sokani2
  • Maya-Badillo, Brenda Aline3
  • Orta-Pineda, Guillermo4
  • Reveles-Félix, Saúl5
  • Becker, Ingeborg6
  • Bárcenas-Barreto, Karla4
  • Torres-Monroy, Adán4
  • Ojeda-Flores, Rafael4
  • Sánchez-Betancourt, José Iván7
  • 1 School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of California, Davis, CA, USA; Laboratorio de Ecología de Enfermedades y Una Salud, Departamento de Etología, Fauna Silvestre y Animales de Laboratorio, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias, región Tuxpan, Universidad Veracruzana, Veracruz, México; Centro de Medicina Tropical, División de Investigación, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México.
  • 3 Laboratorio de Ecología de Enfermedades y Una Salud, Departamento de Etología, Fauna Silvestre y Animales de Laboratorio, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México; Laboratorio de Investigación, Departamento de Medicina y Zootecnia de Cerdos, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México.
  • 4 Laboratorio de Ecología de Enfermedades y Una Salud, Departamento de Etología, Fauna Silvestre y Animales de Laboratorio, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México.
  • 5 Laboratorio de Investigación, Departamento de Medicina y Zootecnia de Cerdos, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México.
  • 6 Centro de Medicina Tropical, División de Investigación, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México.
  • 7 Laboratorio de Investigación, Departamento de Medicina y Zootecnia de Cerdos, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, México; Centro de Enseñanza, Investigación y Extensión en Producción Porcina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Estado de México, México.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ticks and tick-borne diseases
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2022
Volume
13
Issue
1
Pages
101844–101844
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ttbdis.2021.101844
PMID: 34670190
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Tick-borne rickettsioses are caused at least by 15 species of Rickettsia of the Spotted fever group, which represent a major emerging and re-emerging public health problem worldwide. Some of these microorganisms have complex cycles involving the interaction of multiple species of ticks and wild and domestic mammals. Rickettsia infection was investigated in ticks collected from wild pigs at six localities in southeastern Mexico. We collected and tested 196 ticks belonging to four species, including Amblyomma maculatum, Amblyomma mixtum, Amblyomma ovale and Riphicephalus microplus, from 13 of 20 (65%) wild pigs sampled. Overall, Rickettsia DNA was detected in 13.8% of ticks tested (10 ♂ and 17 ♀). Of the 27 Rickettsia-positive ticks, six were A. maculatum, and 21 A. mixtum. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the gltA and ompB genes revealed the presence of Rickettsia parkeri sensu stricto in one female A. maculatum and Rickettsia amblyommatis in five A. maculatum (2 ♂, 3 ♀) and 21 A. mixtum ticks (8 ♂, 13 ♀). The finding of two rickettsial agents in ticks collected from a wild pig population that is regularly captured and kept in captivity or hunted as a source of food raises concern about potential disease transmission to humans and domestic animals. However, more investigations are needed to further understand the ecology of Rickettsia species in free-ranging animals and their implications for human health. Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

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