Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Modulating Complex Sentence Processing in Aphasia Through Attention and Semantic Networks.

Authors
  • Baker, Carolyn1
  • Love, Tracy1, 2
  • 1 SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Language & Communicative Disorders, San Diego, CA.
  • 2 School of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, San Diego State University, CA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
Publication Date
Dec 11, 2023
Volume
66
Issue
12
Pages
5011–5035
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1044/2023_JSLHR-23-00298
PMID: 37934886
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Lexical processing impairments such as delayed and reduced activation of lexical-semantic information have been linked to syntactic processing disruptions and sentence comprehension deficits in individuals with aphasia (IWAs). Lexical-level deficits can also preclude successful lexical encoding during sentence processing and amplify the processing costs of similarity-based interference during syntactic retrieval. We investigate whether two manipulations to engage attention and pre-activate semantic features of a target (to-be-retrieved) noun will (a) boost lexical activation during initial lexical encoding and (b) facilitate syntactic dependency linking through improved resolution of interference in IWAs and neurologically unimpaired age-matched controls (AMCs). Eye-tracking-while-listening with a visual world paradigm was used to investigate whether semantic and attentional manipulations modulated initial lexical processing and downstream syntactic retrieval of the direct-object noun in object-relative sentences. In the attention and semantic manipulations, the AMC group showed no changes in initial lexical access levels; however, gaze patterns revealed clear facilitations in dependency linking and interference resolution. In the IWA group, the attentional cue increased and maintained activation of N1 with modest facilitations in dependency linking. In the semantic condition, IWA results showed a greater degree of facilitation during dependency linking. The results suggest that attention and semantic activation are parameters that may be manipulated to strengthen encoding of lexical representations to facilitate retrieval (i.e., dependency linking) and mitigate similarity-based interference. In IWAs, these manipulations may help to reduce lexical processing deficits that can preclude successful encoding.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times