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[Modern radiation therapy planning and image-guided radiotherapy using the example of prostate cancer].

Authors
  • Koerber, Stefan A1, 2, 3
  • Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina4
  • 1 Klinik für Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120, Heidelberg, Deutschland. [email protected]
  • 2 Nationales Centrum für Tumorerkrankungen (NCT), Heidelberg, Deutschland. [email protected]
  • 3 Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg, Deutschland. [email protected]
  • 4 Abteilung Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Deutschland.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Der Radiologe
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Oct 14, 2020
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00117-020-00763-6
PMID: 33057736
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
German
License
Unknown

Abstract

Optimizing radiotherapy demands precise delineation of the target structure, not only before but also during the course of radiotherapy. For many years, planning of external radiation treatment planning has been based on computer tomography data. With the advent of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional hybrid imaging are increasingly being integrated into radiation treatment planning. The development of the MR-linac can be seen as an innovation. The integration of MRI and hybrid imaging (positron emission tomography [PET]/CT, PET/MRI) in the treatment planning process enables more precise treatment planning due to the better morphological and functional information. The integration of MRI data on the MR-linac in daily position control enables adaptation of the irradiation plan to the current conditions. Technical innovation such as the MR-linac as well as increasing use of hybrid imaging contribute to the objective of further individualization within (radio)oncology. Using the example of prostate cancer, the application of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligands and hybrid imaging offers great potential for individualized strategic treatment decisions. The MR-linac appears to be particularly suitable for radiation therapy of prostate cancer. Special attention must be paid to the technical aspects of positioning and data acquisition for the purpose of radiation treatment planning.

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