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The moderating role of pain catastrophizing on the relationship between partner support and pain intensity: a daily diary study in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

Authors
  • Carriere, Junie S1
  • Lazaridou, Asimina2
  • Martel, Marc Olivier3
  • Cornelius, Marise2
  • Campbell, Claudia4
  • Smith, Michael4
  • Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A4
  • Edwards, Robert R2
  • 1 Department of Anesthesiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital Pain Management Center, Harvard Medical School, 850 Boylston Street, Chestnut Hill, MA, 02467, USA. [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Anesthesiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital Pain Management Center, Harvard Medical School, 850 Boylston Street, Chestnut Hill, MA, 02467, USA.
  • 3 Faculties of Dentistry and Medicine, McGill University, 3640 University Street, Montreal, QC, H3A 2B2, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 4 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 5510 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21224, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of behavioral medicine
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
43
Issue
5
Pages
807–816
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10865-019-00121-5
PMID: 31828692
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the day-to-day associations between partner support, pain catastrophizing and pain intensity in individuals with end-stage knee osteoarthritis. In this microlongitudinal cohort study, participants (N = 124) with end-stage knee osteoarthritis completed baseline measures of trait pain catastrophizing and negative affect. Participants also provided daily diary assessments of partner support, pain catastrophizing and pain intensity for a period of 7 days using a personal digital assistant. Multilevel analyses revealed that day-to-day fluctuations in pain catastrophizing were associated with pain intensity. Data from multilevel analyses indicated that the main effect of partner support was not significantly associated with pain intensity. Results also indicated the interactions between partner support and both trait and state pain catastrophizing were significant, suggesting that both trait and state pain catastrophizing moderated the relationship between daily partner support and pain intensity. That is, on days when participants experienced low levels of partner support, high catastrophizers reported higher levels of pain intensity than low catastrophizers. In the presence of higher levels of partner support, pain intensity did not differ between high and low catastrophizers. These results are consistent with the Communal Coping Model of pain catastrophizing, and highlight the interpersonal context within which pain catastrophizing impacts pain outcomes. These findings also suggest that future interventions designed to specifically target the dynamic between pain catastrophizing and partner support may improve pain outcomes in individuals with end-stage knee OA.

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