Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Modeling correlated information change: from conditional beliefs to quantum conditionals

Authors
  • Baltag, Alexandru1
  • Smets, Sonja1
  • 1 University of Amsterdam, ILLC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands , Amsterdam (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Soft Computing
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Feb 25, 2017
Volume
21
Issue
6
Pages
1523–1535
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00500-017-2499-5
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

In this paper, we propose a unified logical framework for representing and analyzing various forms of correlated information change. Our main thesis is that “logical dynamics,” in the sense of van Benthem (Exploring logical dynamics. CSLI Publications, Stanford, 1996; Logical dynamics of information and interaction. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2011), and in particular dynamic epistemic notions of conditional, as developed in Baltag and Smets (Electron Notes Theor Comput Sci 165:5–21, 2006a; Stud Log 89:185–209, 2008a; Texts in logic and games. Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, pp 9–58, 2008b), play a central role in understanding and modeling a wide range of apparently very different information-gathering phenomena which do have one specific feature in common, namely the very act of learning new information may directly change the reality that is being learned. On the one hand, we focus on the way in which an introspective agent changes her beliefs when learning new higher-order information, i.e., information that may refer to her own beliefs. On the other hand, we analyze situations in which an observer learns about a phenomenon by performing observations that may perturb the very phenomenon under study, as in the case of quantum measurements, or observations in social sciences, psychology and medicine. Our formal techniques are based on ideas from dynamic logic and on the modeling of “dynamic conditionals.” We offer a semantics based on “test frames,” i.e., Kripke frames labeled by propositional formulae which yields a unified setting for the two types of correlated information change under study. We show how this framework can be used to analyze the ontic and epistemic–informational aspects of quantum measurements and to compare them with other types of observation, testing, belief revision, counterfactual conditionals, etc.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times