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Mobile phone addiction and cognitive failures in daily life: The mediating roles of sleep duration and quality and the moderating role of trait self-regulation.

Authors
  • Hong, Wei1
  • Liu, Ru-De2
  • Ding, Yi3
  • Sheng, Xiaotian1
  • Zhen, Rui4
  • 1 Beijing Key Laboratory of Applied Experimental Psychology, National Demonstration Center for Experimental Psychology Education (Beijing Normal University), Faculty of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China. , (China)
  • 2 Beijing Key Laboratory of Applied Experimental Psychology, National Demonstration Center for Experimental Psychology Education (Beijing Normal University), Faculty of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 3 Graduate School of Education, Fordham University, New York, NY 10023, USA.
  • 4 Institute of Psychological Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Addictive behaviors
Publication Date
Mar 05, 2020
Volume
107
Pages
106383–106383
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2020.106383
PMID: 32200196
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Previous studies have reported well-documented findings that mobile phone addiction (MPA) is associated with negative emotion-related consequences; however, sporadic research has investigated the associations between MPA and cognitive outcomes related to daily cognitive functioning. Sleep duration, sleep quality, and trait self-regulation are thought to be linked to this association. The present study aimed to examine the mediating roles of sleep duration and quality and the moderating role of trait self-regulation between MPA and daily cognitive failures. A total of 1721 secondary school students were recruited to complete four self-reported questionnaires. The model results indicated that sleep quality (but not sleep duration) partially mediated the association between MPA and daily cognitive failures, and high levels of trait self-regulation could attenuate the potential impact of MPA on daily cognitive failures through sleep quality. Overall, these findings address the issue of how and when MPA is linked with cognitive performance in daily life, which can advance a better understanding of the negative consequences induced by MPA. Limitations and implications are discussed. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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