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Mitotane (o,p'-DDD) treatment of 200 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Publication Date
Volume
5
Issue
3
Pages
182–190
Identifiers
PMID: 1656032
Source
Medline

Abstract

Two hundred dogs with pituitary dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) were treated with mitotane at an initial daily dosage of 21 to 69 mg/kg (mean = 45.2 mg/kg) for 5 to 14 days. During the induction period, 194 of the dogs also were given daily maintenance dosages of a glucocorticoid. Fifty of the dogs exhibited one or more adverse effects during initial induction, including weakness, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, and ataxia. After completion of the induction period, repeat ACTH stimulation testing revealed significant decreases in mean serum cortisol concentrations when compared with initial values. Twenty-five dogs, however, still responded to exogenous ACTH with serum cortisol concentrations above normal resting range, necessitating daily treatment for an additional 5 to 55 days. In contrast, 70 of the 200 dogs had low post-ACTH serum cortisol concentrations after the induction period. These subnormal serum cortisol concentrations generally increased spontaneously to within normal resting range 2 to 6 weeks after cessation of mitotane. In 184 dogs, mitotane was continued at an initial mean maintenance dosage of 49 mg/kg administered weekly in two to three divided doses. Of these dogs, 107 had one or more relapses of hyperadrenocorticism during treatment. In the 75 dogs that had one relapse, the median maintenance dosage was increased by approximately 35%, whereas the median maintenance dosage in the 32 dogs having two or more relapses was eventually increased by 225% over the initial dosage. After a mean maintenance treatment time of 2.0 years, the final maintenance dosage required in the 184 dogs ranged from 26.8 to 330 mg/kg/week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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