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Mitigation of Rumen Methane Emissions with Foliage and Pods of Tropical Trees

Authors
  • Canul-Solis, Jorge1
  • Campos-Navarrete, María1
  • Piñeiro-Vázquez, Angel
  • Casanova-Lugo, Fernando
  • Barros-Rodríguez, Marcos
  • Chay-Canul, Alfonso
  • Cárdenas-Medina, José1
  • Castillo-Sánchez, Luis1
  • 1 (J.C.-M.)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Animals : an Open Access Journal from MDPI
Publisher
MDPI
Publication Date
May 13, 2020
Volume
10
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/ani10050843
PMID: 32414144
PMCID: PMC7278373
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Simple Summary Methane produced by enteric fermentation contributes to the emission of greenhouse gases (GHG) into the atmosphere. Methane is one of the GHG arising from anthropogenic activities with the greater contribution to global warming. This paper provides a brief introduction to the potential use of tropical foliage trees, pods, and secondary metabolites to reduce methane emissions from ruminant supply chains. A better knowledge of the available strategies for efficient foliage use in the tropics is essential in order to ensure increasing livestock production while preserving the environment. The mitigation of rumen methane production through the use of the foliage and metabolites of tropical trees represents an interesting challenge for scientists working in the field of ruminant nutrition. Abstract Methane produced by enteric fermentation contributes to the emission of greenhouse gases (GHG) into the atmosphere. Methane is one of the GHG resulting from anthropogenic activities with the greater global warming contribution. Ruminant production systems contribute between 18% and 33% of methane emissions. Due to this, there has been growing interest in finding feed alternatives which may help to mitigate methane production in the rumen. The presence of a vast range of secondary metabolites in tropical trees (coumarins, phenols, tannins, and saponins, among others) may be a valuable alternative to manipulate rumen fermentation and partially defaunate the rumen, and thus reduce enteric methane production. Recent reports suggest that it is possible to decrease methane emissions in sheep by up to 27% by feeding them saponins from the tea leaves of Camellia sinensis ; partial defaunation (54%) of the rumen has been achieved using saponins from Sapindus saponaria . The aim of this review was to collect, analyze, and interpret scientific information on the potential of tropical trees and their secondary metabolites to mitigate methane emissions from ruminants.

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