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Mindfulness for Children With ADHD and Mindful Parenting (MindChamp): A Qualitative Study on Feasibility and Effects.

Authors
  • Siebelink, Nienke M1, 2
  • Kaijadoe, Shireen P T2
  • van Horssen, Fylis M2
  • Holtland, Josanne N P2
  • Bögels, Susan M3
  • Buitelaar, Jan K1, 2
  • Speckens, Anne E M4
  • Greven, Corina U1, 2, 5
  • 1 Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 2 Karakter Child and Adolescent Psychiatry University Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 3 Department of Developmental Psychology & Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 4 Radboudumc Center for Mindfulness, Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 5 Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, King's College London, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Attention Disorders
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2021
Volume
25
Issue
13
Pages
1931–1942
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1087054720945023
PMID: 32727260
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Objective: We describe qualitative results on facilitators and barriers to participating in a family mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) for youth with ADHD and their parents and perceived effects on child and parent. Method: Sixty-nine families started the 8-week protocolized group-based MBI called "MYmind." After the MBI, individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of parents (n = 20), children (n = 17, ages 9-16 years), and mindfulness teachers (n = 3). Interviews were analyzed using Grounded Theory. Results: Facilitators and barriers regarding contextual factors (e.g., time investment), MBI characteristics (e.g., parallel parent-child training), and participant characteristics (e.g., ADHD-symptoms) are described. Perceived effects were heterogeneous: no/adverse effects, awareness/insight, acceptance, emotion regulation/reactivity, cognitive functioning, calmness/relaxation, relational changes, generalization. Conclusion: MYmind can lead to a variety of transferable positively perceived effects beyond child ADHD-symptom decrease. Recommendations on MYmind participant inclusion, program characteristics, mindfulness teachers, and evaluating treatment efficacy are provided.

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