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Migrant workers, essential work, and COVID-19.

Authors
  • Reid, Alison1
  • Rhonda-Perez, Elena2
  • Schenker, Marc B3
  • 1 School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Department of Community Nursing, Preventive Medicine and Public Health and History of Science, University of Alicante, Alicante, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 3 Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, California, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2021
Volume
64
Issue
2
Pages
73–77
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/ajim.23209
PMID: 33355943
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Globally, migrant and immigrant workers have borne the brunt of the COVID-19 pandemic as essential workers. They might be a Bulgarian worker at a meat processing plant in Germany, a Central American farmworker in the fields of California, or a Filipino worker at an aged-care facility in Australia. What they have in common is they are all essential workers who have worked throughout the coronavirus pandemic and have been infected with coronavirus at work. COVID-19 has highlighted the inequitable working conditions of these workers. In many instances, they are employed precariously, and so are ineligible for sick leave or social security, or COVID-19 special payments. If these are essential workers, they should get at least the same health and safety benefits of all nonessential workers. Improving the working and living conditions of migrant workers can and should be a positive outcome of the coronavirus pandemic. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC.

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