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Microscopic anatomy of the skin of the woodchuck (Marmota monax): comparison of woodchuck hepatitis virus-infected and non-infected animals.

Authors
  • Panić, R
  • Scott, D W
  • Anderson, W I
  • Tennant, B C
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Cornell veterinarian
Publication Date
Oct 01, 1992
Volume
82
Issue
4
Pages
387–404
Identifiers
PMID: 1424633
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Thirty-three woodchucks were used in this study. Seventeen animals were healthy adults, not infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV); 10 were healthy adults infected with WHV; 4 were noninfected neonates; 2 were infected neonates. Within the 4 groups of woodchucks, no histologic differences were detected on the basis of sex or age. Neither were histologic findings different between infected and noninfected woodchucks of similar ages. The average thickness of skin (as measured from the skin surface to the inner limit of the dermis) from the general haired body area was 2394 microns. The skin was thickest on dorsal body areas, and gradually became thinner on ventral body and medial limb areas. The epidermis consisted of 4 layers: stratum basale, stratum spinosum, stratum granulosum, and stratum corneum. A stratum lucidum was present only in the epidermis of the footpads. There was no clear distinction between the superficial dermis and the deep dermis, except for the subtle differences in arrangement and size of collagen fibers. Elastic fibers were seen throughout the dermis, being more prominent in the superficial portion. Both compound and simple hair follicle arrangements were seen, with compound being more common. The arrectores pilorum muscles were largest in the skin over the dorsal body areas. Sebaceous glands were present either within the outer root sheath of hair follicles or in the dense connective tissue surrounding hair follicles. No apocrine sweat glands were found. However, there were abundant eccrine sweat glands in the subcutaneous fat of the footpads.

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