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MicroRNA in Immune Regulation.

Authors
  • Wu, Cheng-Jang1
  • Lu, Li-Fan2, 3, 4
  • 1 Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.
  • 2 Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. [email protected]
  • 3 Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. [email protected]
  • 4 Center for Microbiome Innovation, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current topics in microbiology and immunology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2017
Volume
410
Pages
249–267
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/82_2017_65
PMID: 28900683
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The immune system protects us from enormously diverse microbial pathogens but needs to be tightly regulated to avoid deleterious immune-mediated inflammation and tissue damage. A wide range of molecular determinants and cellular components work in concert to control the magnitude and duration of a given immune response. In the past decade, microRNAs (miRNAs), a major class of small non-coding RNA species, have been extensively studied as key molecular players in immune regulation. In this chapter, we will discuss how miRNAs function as negative regulators to restrict innate and adaptive immune responses. Moreover, we will review the current reports regarding miRNAs in human immunological diseases. Finally, we will also address the emerging roles of other non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in particular, in the regulation of the immune system.

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