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Microfluidics-based device for the measurement of blood viscosity and its modeling based on shear rate, temperature, and heparin concentration

Authors
  • Khnouf, Ruba1
  • Karasneh, Dina1, 2
  • Abdulhay, Enas1
  • Abdelhay, Arwa3
  • Sheng, Weian4
  • Fan, Z. Hugh4, 5, 6
  • 1 Jordan University of Science and Technology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Irbid, 22110, Jordan , Irbid (Jordan)
  • 2 Jordan University of Science and Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Irbid, 22110, Jordan , Irbid (Jordan)
  • 3 German Jordanian University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Natural Resources Engineering and Management, Amman, 11180, Jordan , Amman (Jordan)
  • 4 University of Florida, Interdisciplinary Microsystems Group, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA , Gainesville (United States)
  • 5 University of Florida, J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA , Gainesville (United States)
  • 6 University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA , Gainesville (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biomedical Microdevices
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Aug 15, 2019
Volume
21
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10544-019-0426-5
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
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Abstract

Blood viscosity measurements are crucial for the diagnosis and understanding of a range of hematological and cardiovascular diseases. Such measurements are heavily used in monitoring patients during and after surgeries, which necessitates the development of a highly accurate viscometer that uses a minimal amount of blood. In this work, we have designed and implemented a microfluidic device that was used to measure fluid viscosity with a high accuracy using less than 10 μl of blood. The device was further used to construct a blood viscosity model based on temperature, shear rate, and anti-coagulant concentration. The model has an R-squared value of 0.950. Finally, blood protein content was changed to simulate diseased conditions and blood viscosity was measured using the device and estimated using the model constructed in this work. Simulated diseased conditions were clearly detected when comparing estimated viscosity values using the model and the measured values using the device, proving the applicability of the setup in the detection of rheological anomalies and in disease diagnosis.

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