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Microfluidics for research and applications in oncology.

Authors
  • Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant1
  • Ebrahimi Warkiani, Majid2
  • Jing, Tengyang3
  • Kenry4
  • Lim, Chwee Teck5
  • 1 Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411. , (Singapore)
  • 2 BioSystems and Micromechanics (BioSyM) IRG, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Centre, Singapore 138602 and School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia. [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 3 BioSystems and Micromechanics (BioSyM) IRG, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Centre, Singapore 138602 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117575. [email protected] , (Singapore)
  • 4 Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117575. [email protected] and NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456. , (Singapore)
  • 5 Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411 and BioSystems and Micromechanics (BioSyM) IRG, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Centre, Singapore 138602. , (Singapore)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Analyst
Publisher
The Royal Society of Chemistry
Publication Date
Jan 21, 2016
Volume
141
Issue
2
Pages
504–524
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1039/c5an00382b
PMID: 26010996
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cancer is currently one of the top non-communicable human diseases, and continual research and developmental efforts are being made to better understand and manage this disease. More recently, with the improved understanding in cancer biology as well as the advancements made in microtechnology and rapid prototyping, microfluidics is increasingly being explored and even validated for use in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. With inherent advantages such as small sample volume, high sensitivity and fast processing time, microfluidics is well-positioned to serve as a promising platform for applications in oncology. In this review, we look at the recent advances in the use of microfluidics, from basic research such as understanding cancer cell phenotypes as well as metastatic behaviors to applications such as the detection, diagnosis, prognosis and drug screening. We then conclude with a future outlook on this promising technology.

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