Affordable Access

Access to the full text

The Microbiome and Gynecologic Cancer: Current Evidence and Future Opportunities

Authors
  • Chambers, Laura M.1
  • Bussies, Parker1
  • Vargas, Roberto1, 2
  • Esakov, Emily3
  • Tewari, Surabhi3, 4
  • Reizes, Ofer2, 3
  • Michener, Chad1, 2
  • 1 Cleveland Clinic, Desk A81, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA , Cleveland (United States)
  • 2 Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH, USA , Cleveland (United States)
  • 3 Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA , Cleveland (United States)
  • 4 Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA , Cleveland (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current Oncology Reports
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 14, 2021
Volume
23
Issue
8
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11912-021-01079-x
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Topical Collection on Gynecologic Cancers
License
Yellow

Abstract

Purpose of ReviewWe review the emerging evidence regarding the relationship between the microbiota of the gastrointestinal and female reproductive tracts and gynecologic cancer.Recent FindingsThe microbiome has essential roles in maintaining health. In recent years, the microbiota of the gastrointestinal and female reproductive tracts have been linked to many diseases, including gynecologic cancer. Alterations to the bacterial populations in a microbiota, or dysbiosis, have been shown to favor a pro-carcinogenic state through altered immune responses, dysregulated hormone metabolism, and modulation of the cell cycle. Pre-clinical and clinical studies have emerged, demonstrating that specific bacteria or microbial communities may be associated with increased risk for uterine, ovarian, and cervical cancers. Notably, numerous studies have linked a non-Lactobacillus-dominant vaginal microbiota, composed of anaerobic bacteria, with HPV infection, persistence, and development of invasive cervical cancer. Similarly, next-generation high-throughput sequencing techniques have enabled the characterization of unique microbiotas in patients with malignant and benign gynecologic conditions, shedding light on new associations between bacterial species and gynecologic cancers. Harnessing the power of the microbiome for early diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and modulation creates tremendous potential to optimize gynecologic cancer outcomes in the future.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times