Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Microbial and volatile profiling of soils suppressive to Fusarium culmorum of wheat.

Authors
  • Ossowicki, Adam1
  • Tracanna, Vittorio2
  • Petrus, Marloes L C3
  • van Wezel, Gilles3
  • Raaijmakers, Jos M1, 3
  • Medema, Marnix H2
  • Garbeva, Paolina1
  • 1 Department of Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 2 Bioinformatics Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 3 Institute of Biology, University of Leiden, Leiden, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Proceedings of The Royal Society B Biological Sciences
Publisher
The Royal Society
Publication Date
Feb 26, 2020
Volume
287
Issue
1921
Pages
20192527–20192527
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2019.2527
PMID: 32070256
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In disease-suppressive soils, microbiota protect plants from root infections. Bacterial members of this microbiota have been shown to produce specific molecules that mediate this phenotype. To date, however, studies have focused on individual suppressive soils and the degree of natural variability of soil suppressiveness remains unclear. Here, we screened a large collection of field soils for suppressiveness to Fusarium culmorum using wheat (Triticum aestivum) as a model host plant. A high variation of disease suppressiveness was observed, with 14% showing a clear suppressive phenotype. The microbiological basis of suppressiveness to F. culmorum was confirmed by gamma sterilization and soil transplantation. Amplicon sequencing revealed diverse bacterial taxonomic compositions and no specific taxa were found exclusively enriched in all suppressive soils. Nonetheless, co-occurrence network analysis revealed that two suppressive soils shared an overrepresented bacterial guild dominated by various Acidobacteria. In addition, our study revealed that volatile emission may contribute to suppression, but not for all suppressive soils. Our study raises new questions regarding the possible mechanistic variability of disease-suppressive phenotypes across physico-chemically different soils. Accordingly, we anticipate that larger-scale soil profiling, along with functional studies, will enable a deeper understanding of disease-suppressive microbiomes.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times