Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Microbial Metabolism Modulates Antibiotic Susceptibility within the Murine Gut Microbiome.

Authors
  • Cabral, Damien J1
  • Penumutchu, Swathi1
  • Reinhart, Elizabeth M1
  • Zhang, Cheng2
  • Korry, Benjamin J1
  • Wurster, Jenna I1
  • Nilson, Rachael1
  • Guang, August3
  • Sano, William H1
  • Rowan-Nash, Aislinn D1
  • Li, Hu2
  • Belenky, Peter4
  • 1 Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Brown University, Providence, RI 02906, USA.
  • 2 Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55904, USA.
  • 3 Center for Computation & Visualization, Brown University, Brown University, Providence, RI 02906, USA; Center for Computational Biology of Human Disease, Brown University, Providence, RI 02906, USA.
  • 4 Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Brown University, Providence, RI 02906, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cell metabolism
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
30
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2019.08.020
PMID: 31523007
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Although antibiotics disturb the structure of the gut microbiota, factors that modulate these perturbations are poorly understood. Bacterial metabolism is an important regulator of susceptibility in vitro and likely plays a large role within the host. We applied a metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approach to link antibiotic-induced taxonomic and transcriptional responses within the murine microbiome. We found that antibiotics significantly alter the expression of key metabolic pathways at the whole-community and single-species levels. Notably, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which blooms in response to amoxicillin, upregulated polysaccharide utilization. In vitro, we found that the sensitivity of this bacterium to amoxicillin was elevated by glucose and reduced by polysaccharides. Accordingly, we observed that dietary composition affected the abundance and expansion of B. thetaiotaomicron, as well as the extent of microbiome disruption with amoxicillin. Our work indicates that the metabolic environment of the microbiome plays a role in the response of this community to antibiotics. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times