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Methodology for assessing the individual role of fish, oyster, phytoplankton and macroalgae in the ecology of integrated production in earthen ponds

Authors
  • Cunha, M.E.1
  • Quental-Ferreira, H.1
  • Parejo, A.1
  • Gamito, S.2
  • Ribeiro, L.1
  • Moreira, M.1, 2
  • Monteiro, I.1
  • Soares, F.1
  • Pousão-Ferreira, P.1
  • 1 IPMA - Portuguese Institute of the Sea and Atmosphere EPPO - Aquaculture Research Station, Av. do Parque Natural da Ria Formosa s/n, 8700-194 Olhão, Portugal
  • 2 CCMAR, Centre of Marine Sciences and FCT, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
Type
Published Article
Journal
MethodsX
Publisher
Elsevier BV
Publication Date
Oct 24, 2019
Volume
6
Pages
2570–2576
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.mex.2019.10.016
PMID: 31763188
PMCID: PMC6861580
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Production costs in extensive and semi-intensive fish culture in earthen ponds are often too high to offer sustainable economic activity due to the low productivity of these systems. The right combination of commercial finfish species with inorganic (primary producers) and organic extractive (bivalves) species in Integrated MultiTrophic Aquaculture (IMTA) create a balanced system with higher profitability and risk reduction. To achieve this, it is crucial to understand the role of each functional groups within the system what we did by comparing three different IMTA production three different IMTA production treatments with distinct combinations of trophic levels: • fish, filter feeders, phytoplankton and macroalgae, • fish, filter feeders and phytoplankton • fish, phytoplankton and macroalgae Each treatment was carried out in two similar ponds under semi-intensive conditions and flow through system, in a total of 6 earthen ponds of 500 m2 surface and depth of 1.5 m. Results showed that the presence of oysters in the ponds enhanced water quality by decreasing turbidity and by controlling phytoplankton which led to regulation of dissolved oxygen levels. The enhanced water quality in these systems lead to improved fish performance and higher biomass production contributing to greater profitability. The combination of fish, oyster, phytoplankton and macroalgae was particularly good providing much more fish supply compared with the other two treatments. • Oysters enhanced water quality in the ponds by decreasing turbidity and controlling phytoplankton which regulated the dissolved oxygen levels. • The enhanced water quality in systems with oysters improve fish performance resulting in higher biomass production and greater profitability. • The combination of fish, oyster, phytoplankton and macroalgae was particularly good providing much more fish supply compared with the other two treatments.

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