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Metal contamination of home garden soils and cultivated vegetables in the province of Brescia, Italy: implications for human exposure.

Authors
  • Ferri, Roberta1
  • Hashim, Dana2
  • Smith, Donald R3
  • Guazzetti, Stefano4
  • Donna, Filippo1
  • Ferretti, Enrica5
  • Curatolo, Michele5
  • Moneta, Caterina5
  • Beone, Gian Maria6
  • Lucchini, Roberto G7
  • 1 Occupational Health, University of Brescia, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 2 Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA.
  • 3 Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
  • 4 Public Health Service, Reggio Emilia, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 5 Department of Food Chemistry, Metal Laboratory, IZSLER, Brescia, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 6 Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Chemistry, Università Cattolica, Piacenza, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 7 Occupational Health, University of Brescia, Italy; Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA; Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA. , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Science of the total environment
Publication Date
Jun 15, 2015
Volume
518-519
Pages
507–517
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.02.072
PMID: 25777956
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Prolonged industrial emissions increase median metal concentrations and most soluble fractions (BCR F1+F2) in home garden soils near ferroalloy plants. Areas near ferroalloy plant sites had spinach Cd and Pb metal concentrations several-fold above maximum standard references. We recommend thorough washing of vegetables to minimize metal exposure.

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