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Metagenomic characterization of bacterial biofilm in four food processing plants in Colombia.

Authors
  • Caraballo Guzmán, Arley1
  • González Hurtado, Maria Isabel2
  • Cuesta-Astroz, Yesid1
  • Torres, Giovanny3
  • 1 Colombian Institute of Tropical Medicine, CES University, Carrera 43A # 52 Sur 99, Sabaneta, Colombia. , (Colombia)
  • 2 Department of Research and Development, Zenú Food Industry, Carrera 64C # 104-3, Medellín, Colombia. , (Colombia)
  • 3 Colombian Institute of Tropical Medicine, CES University, Carrera 43A # 52 Sur 99, Sabaneta, Colombia. [email protected] , (Colombia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brazilian journal of microbiology : [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology]
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
51
Issue
3
Pages
1259–1267
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s42770-020-00260-x
PMID: 32221908
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Bacteria inside biofilms are more persistent and resistant to stress conditions found in the production environment of food processing plants, thus representing a constant risk for product safety and quality. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize, using 16S rRNA sequencing, the bacterial communities from biofilms found in four food processing plants (P1, P2, P3, and P4). In total, 50 samples from these four processing plants were taken after cleaning and disinfection processes. Four phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroides represented over 94% of the operational taxonomic units found across these four plants. A total of 102 families and 189 genera were identified. Two genera, Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp., were the most frequently found (93.47%) across the four plants. In P1, Pseudomonas spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were the dominant genera, whereas Lactobacillus spp. and Streptococcus spp. were identified in P2. On the other hand, biofilms found in P3 and P4 mainly consisted of Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. Our results indicate that different bacterial genera of interest to the food industry due to their ability to form biofilm and affect food quality can coexist inside biofilms, and as such, persist in production environments, representing a constant risk for manufactured foods. In addition, the core microbiota identified across processing plants evaluated was probably influenced by type of food produced and cleaning and disinfection processes performed in each one of these.

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