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Metabolic transit of dietary advanced glycation end-products - the case of NƐ-carboxymethyllysine.

Authors
  • Tessier, Frederic J1
  • Boulanger, Eric2
  • Howsam, Michael2
  • 1 Inserm, CHU Lille, Pasteur Institute of Lille, University of Lille, U1167 - RID-AGE, F-59000, Lille, France. [email protected] , (France)
  • 2 Inserm, CHU Lille, Pasteur Institute of Lille, University of Lille, U1167 - RID-AGE, F-59000, Lille, France. , (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Glycoconjugate Journal
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2021
Volume
38
Issue
3
Pages
311–317
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10719-020-09950-y
PMID: 32990827
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The Maillard reaction, also called glycation, is one of the major chemical reactions responsible for most yellow-to-brown colors and aromas in cooked foods. This reaction between reducing sugars and amino functions on proteins affects not only the flavor of food, but also leads to the formation of an heterogenous group of structurally-modified amino acids. Some of these, known as "advanced glycation end products" (AGEs), have been found in both foods and human biological fluids, tissues and organs. Except for those that are formed over long periods in vivo at 37 °C, AGEs in the body originate from the digestion and absorption of dietary sources. A high or chronic exposure to dietary AGEs (dAGEs) is suspected as potentially detrimental to human health and studies in the field of food safety have begun to focus their attention on the metabolic transit of dAGEs. This review presents some important findings in this field, with a focus on NƐ-carboxymethyllysine, and presents the evidence for and against an association between intake of dAGEs and their presence in the body. New and promising avenues of research are described, and some future directions outlined.

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