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Metabolic role of cGMP in S. cerevisiae: the murine phosphodiesterase-5 activity affects yeast cell proliferation by altering the cAMP/cGMP equilibrium.

Authors
  • Cardarelli, Silvia1
  • Giorgi, Mauro1
  • Poiana, Giancarlo1
  • Biagioni, Stefano1
  • Saliola, Michele1
  • 1 Department of Biology and Biotechnology "C. Darwin", Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro, Rome 5, 00185, Italy. , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
FEMS Yeast Research
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
May 01, 2019
Volume
19
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/femsyr/foz016
PMID: 30772891
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In higher eukaryotes, cAMP and cGMP are signal molecules of major transduction pathways while phosphodiesterases (PDE) are a superfamily of cAMP/cGMP hydrolysing enzymes, modulatory components of these routes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae harbours two genes for PDE: Pde2 is a high affinity cAMP-hydrolysing enzyme, while Pde1 can hydrolyse both cAMP and cGMP. To gain insight into the metabolic role of cGMP in the physiology of yeast, the murine Pde5a1 gene encoding a specific cGMP-hydrolysing enzyme, was expressed in S. cerevisiae pdeΔ strains. pde1Δ and pde2Δ PDE5A1-transformed strain displayed opposite growth-curve profiles; while PDE5A1 recovered the growth delay of pde1Δ, PDE5A1 reversed the growth profile of pde2Δ to that of the untransformed pde1Δ. Growth test analysis and the use of Adh2 and Adh1 as respiro-fermentative glycolytic flux markers confirmed that PDE5A1 altered the metabolism by acting on Pde1-Pde2/cyclic nucleotides content and also on the TORC1 nutrient-sensing cascade. cGMP is required during the log-phase of cell proliferation to adjust/modulate cAMP levels inside well-defined ranges. A model is presented proposing the role of cGMP in the cAMP/PKA pathway. The expression of the PDE5A1 cassette in other mutant strains might constitute the starting tool to define cGMP metabolic role in yeast nutrient signaling. © FEMS 2019.

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