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Metabolic engineering and transcriptomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing p-coumaric acid from xylose

Authors
  • Borja, Gheorghe M.1
  • Rodriguez, Angelica1, 2
  • Campbell, Kate3
  • Borodina, Irina1
  • Chen, Yun3
  • Nielsen, Jens1, 3, 4, 2
  • 1 Technical University of Denmark, The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Lyngby, 2800, Denmark , Lyngby (Denmark)
  • 2 University of Copenhagen, The Bioinformatics Centre, Section for Computational and RNA Biology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Ole Maaloes Vej 5, Copenhagen, 2200, Denmark , Copenhagen (Denmark)
  • 3 Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Gothenburg, 412 96, Sweden , Gothenburg (Sweden)
  • 4 BioInnovation Institute, Ole Måløes Vej 3, Copenhagen N, 2200, Denmark , Copenhagen N (Denmark)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Microbial Cell Factories
Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Nov 05, 2019
Volume
18
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s12934-019-1244-4
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

BackgroundAromatic amino acids and their derivatives are valuable chemicals and are precursors for different industrially compounds. p-Coumaric acid is the main building block for complex secondary metabolites in commercial demand, such as flavonoids and polyphenols. Industrial scale production of this compound from yeast however remains challenging.ResultsUsing metabolic engineering and a systems biology approach, we developed a Saccharomyces cerevisiae platform strain able to produce 242 mg/L of p-coumaric acid from xylose. The same strain produced only 5.35 mg/L when cultivated with glucose as carbon source. To characterise this platform strain further, transcriptomic analysis was performed, comparing this strain’s growth on xylose and glucose, revealing a strong up-regulation of the glyoxylate pathway alongside increased cell wall biosynthesis and unexpectedly a decrease in aromatic amino acid gene expression when xylose was used as carbon source.ConclusionsThe resulting S. cerevisiae strain represents a promising platform host for future production of p-coumaric using xylose as a carbon source.

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