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Menstrual cycle characteristics and steroid hormone, prolactin, and growth factor levels in premenopausal women

Authors
  • Farland, Leslie V.1, 2
  • Mu, Fan1
  • Eliassen, A. Heather1, 3
  • Hankinson, Susan E.1, 3, 4
  • Tworoger, Shelley S.1, 3, 5
  • Barbieri, Robert L.2
  • Dowsett, Mitch6
  • Pollak, Michael N.7
  • Missmer, Stacey A.1, 2, 3, 8
  • 1 Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Boston, MA, USA , Boston (United States)
  • 2 Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, 221 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA, 02115, USA , Boston (United States)
  • 3 Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA , Boston (United States)
  • 4 University of Massachusetts, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, Amherst, MA, USA , Amherst (United States)
  • 5 Moffitt Cancer Center, Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Tampa, FL, USA , Tampa (United States)
  • 6 The Royal Marsden Hospital, Academic Department of Biochemistry, London, UK , London (United Kingdom)
  • 7 McGill University and Lady Davis Research Institute, Department of Oncology, Montreal, QC, Canada , Montreal (Canada)
  • 8 Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Boston, MA, USA , Boston (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer Causes & Control
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Oct 31, 2017
Volume
28
Issue
12
Pages
1441–1452
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10552-017-0971-2
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

PurposeMenstrual cycle characteristics are markers of endocrine milieu. However, associations between age at menarche and adulthood sex steroid hormone levels have been inconsistent, and data on menstrual characteristics and non-sex steroid hormones are sparse.MethodsWe assessed the relations of menstrual characteristics with premenopausal plasma sex steroid hormones, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), prolactin, and growth factors among 2,745 premenopausal women (age 32–52) from the Nurses’ Health Study II. Geometric means and tests for trend were calculated using multivariable general linear models.ResultsEarly age at menarche was associated with higher premenopausal early-follicular free estradiol (percent difference < 12 vs. > 13 years = 11%), early-follicular estrone (7%), luteal estrone (7%), and free testosterone (8%) (all ptrend < 0.05). Short menstrual cycle length at age 18–22 was associated with higher early-follicular total (< 26 vs. > 39 days = 18%) and free estradiol (16%), early-follicular estrone (9%), SHBG (7%), lower luteal free estradiol (− 14%), total (− 6%), and free testosterone (− 15%) (all ptrend < 0.05). Short adult menstrual length was associated with higher early-follicular total estradiol (< 26 vs. > 31 days = 14%), SHBG (10%), lower luteal estrone (− 8%), progesterone (− 9%), total (− 11%) and free testosterone (− 25%), and androstenedione (− 14%) (all ptrend < 0.05). Irregularity of menses at 18–22 was associated with lower early-follicular total (irregular vs. very regular = − 14%) and free estradiol (− 14%), and early-follicular estrone (− 8%) (All ptrend < 0.05). Irregularity of adult menstrual cycle was associated with lower luteal total estradiol (irregular vs. very regular = − 8%), SHBG (− 3%), higher total (8%), and free testosterone (11%) (all ptrend < 0.05).ConclusionsEarly-life and adulthood menstrual characteristics are moderately associated with mid-to-late reproductive year’s hormone concentrations. These relations of menstrual characteristics with endogenous hormone levels could partially account for associations between menstrual characteristics and reproductive cancers or other chronic diseases.

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