Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

The Mediterranean diet decreases prothrombotic microvesicle release in asymptomatic individuals at high cardiovascular risk.

Authors
  • Chiva-Blanch, Gemma1
  • Sala-Vila, Aleix2
  • Crespo, Javier3
  • Ros, Emilio2
  • Estruch, Ramon4
  • Badimon, Lina5
  • 1 Cardiovascular Program ICCC, Institut de Recerca Hospital Santa Creu i Sant Pau - IIB Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Spain)
  • 2 CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain; Lipid Clinic, Endocrinology and Nutrition Service, Biomedical Research Institute August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 3 Cardiovascular Program ICCC, Institut de Recerca Hospital Santa Creu i Sant Pau - IIB Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 4 CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain; Department of Internal Medicine, IDIBAPS, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 5 Cardiovascular Program ICCC, Institut de Recerca Hospital Santa Creu i Sant Pau - IIB Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Enfermedades Cardiovasculares (CIBERCV), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland)
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2020
Volume
39
Issue
11
Pages
3377–3384
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.clnu.2020.02.027
PMID: 32147198
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Circulating microvesicles (cMV) are small phospholipid-rich vesicles that contribute to the atherothrombotic process, and are biomarkers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden and progression. Diet is a cornerstone for CVD prevention, but dietary effects on cMV shedding are poorly characterized. We aimed at assessing the long term effects of a Mediterranean diet compared to a low-fat diet (LFD) on MV shedding by cells of the blood and vascular compartments in patients at high cardiovascular risk treated as per guidelines. A total of 155 participants from the PREDIMED trial free of cardiovascular events after a mean follow-up of 5 years (n = 53 from the Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil -EVOO-; n = 49 from the Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts -Nuts-; and n = 53 from the LFD) were included in the study. At baseline and after one-year intervention, cMV were quantified and characterized by flow cytometry to identify their activated parental cell origin and prothrombotic potential by Annexin V (AV) binding. After one year of dietary intervention, platelet-derived PAC-1+/AV+ and CD62P+/AV+ cMV concentrations were lower in the Nuts group compared with the LFD and EVOO interventions (P = 0.036 and 0.003, respectively). In addition, prothrombotic cMV carrying tissue factor (CD142+/AV+) and CD11a+/AV+ cMV derived from activated cells, were significantly lower in both Mediterranean diet (EVOO and Nuts) interventions compared to one year of LFD (P < 0.0001 and 0.028, respectively). SMAα+/AV- cMV were lower in the LFD compared to the Nuts group after one year of intervention (P = 0.038). cMV are markers of cell activation and vascular injury that appear to be sensitive to dietary changes. Following a Mediterranean diet rich in EVOO or nuts is associated with lower cell activation towards a pro-atherothrombotic phenotype, suggesting a delay in the development of CV complications. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times