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Medication-assisted treatment and self-help group participation among military veterans with opioid or alcohol use disorder.

Authors
  • Albright, David L1
  • McDaniel, J T2
  • Suntai, Z3
  • Laha-Walsh, M K3
  • Frick, K4
  • Weatherly, T4
  • McIntosh, S3
  • 1 School of Social Work, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA [email protected].
  • 2 School of Human Sciences, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, Illinois, USA.
  • 3 School of Social Work, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA.
  • 4 Southern Illinois University System, Carbondale, Illinois, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMJ military health
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2023
Volume
169
Issue
3
Pages
256–262
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-001845
PMID: 34253642
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is a combination of behavioural therapy and medications to assist with recovery and has been administered to individuals with alcohol and opioid withdrawal symptoms. Military veterans seeking MAT could have barriers preventing them from receiving the care they desire. The present study sought to compare outcomes in individuals who received MAT or those who participated in self-help groups for opioid or alcohol use disorder. In addition, the present study sought to compare outcomes between veterans and non-military-connected individuals. We used the 2015-2017 United States Treatment Episode Data Set Discharges data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The data set included 138 594 unique discharges. A multinomial logistic regression model was used to examine differences in substance use outcomes for veterans/non-veterans in MAT and a self-help group. Fewer veterans (2.58%) than non-veterans (4.28%) reported usage of MAT. Fewer veterans (38.94%) than non-veterans (40.17%) reported signing up for a self-help group. Finally, those who participated in MAT and a self-help group had a better outcome (66.64%)-defined as no substance use at discharge-than those who only received MAT (43.02%) and those who did not participate in MAT or self-help groups (34.84%). Recommendations for future research on MAT and implementation for the veteran population would benefit the literature base. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2023. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

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