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Medical Education and the Stigmatization of Mental Illness in the Philippines.

Authors
  • Taguibao, Candice1
  • Rosenheck, Robert2, 3
  • 1 Yale School of Public Health, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT, 06511, USA.
  • 2 Yale School of Public Health, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT, 06511, USA. [email protected]
  • 3 Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, 950 Campbell Ave., Building 35, West Haven, CT, 06516, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Culture Medicine and Psychiatry
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2021
Volume
45
Issue
2
Pages
312–331
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11013-020-09688-0
PMID: 32930905
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

A mixed-methods study assessed mental illness stigma within the Philippine medical community. A 43-item survey was completed by three groups: (1) medical students with no prior mental health training (N = 76, 31%), (2) medical students with psychiatric classroom and/or clerkship experience (N = 43, 18%), and (3) graduate physicians (N = 125, 51%). Exploratory factor analysis identified three de-stigmatized factors for comparisons between the three Filipino groups and with medical students from 5 other countries. Surveys were followed by in-depth qualitative interviews (N = 15). The three de-stigmatized factors were as follows: (1) acceptance of social integration of mental health patients, (2) positive personal interactions with people experiencing mental illness, and (3) rejection of supernatural explanations for mental illness. While overall scores among the sample showed highly de-stigmatized attitudes, graduate physicians reported more stigmatized scores than students on social integration and personal socialization (F = 3.45, p = 0.033, F = 4.11, p = 0.018, respectively). Filipino medical students also had less stigmatizing mental health attitudes compared to students from the USA, Brazil, Ghana, Nigeria, and China. Qualitative interviews confirmed low levels of mental health stigma among the Philippine medical community, while acknowledging the persistence of stigma in the general Philippine populace.

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