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Mechanisms of pHi control and relationships between tension and pHi in human subcutaneous small arteries.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American journal of physiology
Publication Date
Volume
268
Issue
3 Pt 1
Identifiers
PMID: 7900765
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Intracellular pH (pHi) control and relationships between pHi and tension have been investigated in human subcutaneous small arteries. Isometric tension and pHi (using 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)- 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein) were estimated simultaneously. pHi recovery from an acute acid load was dependent on external Na+ and partially inhibited by the absence of HCO3(-) [N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)-buffered solution] or by the anion transport inhibitor 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS). In an HCO3(-)-buffered physiological salt solution (PSS), pHi recovery was partially blocked by hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchange, and completely blocked by DIDS and HMA together. Intracellular Cl- depletion of arteries did not affect the rate of pHi recovery in PSS from an acid load. pHi recovery from acute alkalosis was unaffected by external Na+ removal, reduced in HEPES buffer, and abolished by removal of external Cl-. These data suggest that human small arteries maintain pHi by Na+/H+ exchange and Na(+)-dependent HCO3(-) exchange in response to an acid load, and Na(+)-independent Cl-/HCO3(-) exchange to counteract intracellular alkalosis. Norepinephrine (NE)-, endothelin-1 (ET-1)-, arginine vasopressin (AVP)-, and K(+)-induced tension did not alter pHi in PSS, but there was a small fall with angiotensin II (ANG II). In HEPES, stimulation with K+, NE, ANG II, or AVP led to a fall in pHi, but this did not occur with ET-1. It is therefore unlikely in vivo that an increase in pHi in these arteries would be involved in either tension development or growth induced by these agonists.

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