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Mechanical evaluation of a porous bone graft substitute based on poly(propylene glycol-co-fumaric acid).

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
1552-4973
Publisher
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Volume
66
Issue
1
Pages
311–317
Identifiers
PMID: 12808589
Source
Medline

Abstract

A porous, resorbable polymer composite based on poly(propylene glycol-co-fumaric acid) (PPF) was mechanically evaluated in vitro for use as a bone graft substitute and fracture fixative. The test material created a dynamic system capable of initially providing mechanical integrity to bony voids and a degradative mechanism for ingrowth by native bone. The unsaturated polymer, PPF, was crosslinked in the presence of effervescent agents to yield a porous microstructure upon curing. An in vitro degradation study first assessed the temporal mechanical properties of the test material. This research was followed by an ex vivo study using a long-bone osteotomy model to characterize the mechanics of fixation. Results showed the initial compressive strength of the cross-linked PPF system was comparable to cancellous bone. The rate of strength loss was commensurate with the predicted mechanical recovery of healing bone with analogous results in a composite that comprised also 25% (by weight) autograft. Mechanical testing in the long-bone model demonstrated that PPF-based bone-graft substitute increased the flexural strength of K-wire stabilized osteotomies. These results suggest that this type of bone graft substitute may have clinical utility in the stabilization of complex tubular bone fractures.

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