Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Measuring the neural correlates of the violation of social expectations: A comparison of two experimental tasks.

Authors
  • Portengen, Christel M1
  • Huffmeijer, Rens2
  • van Baar, Anneloes L1
  • Endendijk, Joyce J1
  • 1 Child and Adolescent Studies, Clinical Child and Family Studies, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 2 Institute of Education and Child Studies, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Social Neuroscience
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2022
Volume
17
Issue
1
Pages
58–72
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/17470919.2022.2032327
PMID: 35057710
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Evidence exists that people's brains respond differently to stimuli that violate social expectations. However, there are inconsistencies between studies in the event-related potentials (ERP) on which differential brain responses are found, as well as in the direction of the differences. Therefore, the current paper examined which of the two most frequently used tasks, the Impression Formation Task (IFT) or Implicit Association Test (IAT), provided more robust ERP components in response to the violation of gendered expectations. Both IFT and IAT paradigms were administered in a counter-balanced way among 25 young adults (age 22-31, 56% male), while brain activity was assessed with electroencephalography. The IFT and IAT specifically measured the violation of gendered expectations with regard to toy preferences and behavioral tendencies of young children. The results showed that both tasks were able to elicit relevant ERP components. Yet, the IFT evoked ERP effects of the violation of gendered expectations on all but one of the selected ERP components; the P1, N1, and LPP. The IAT only elicited different P3 amplitudes when expectations were violated. We recommend the use of IFT paradigms when studying neural processes underlying the violation of social expectations.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times