Affordable Access

Maternal mortality in an Israeli hospital: a review of 23 years.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics
0020-7292
Publisher
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Volume
17
Issue
2
Pages
154–158
Identifiers
PMID: 41762
Source
Medline
Keywords
  • Age Factors
  • Asia
  • Bleeding
  • Demographic Factors
  • Developed Countries
  • Diseases
  • Israel
  • Maternal Mortality--Etiology
  • Mediterranean Countries
  • Mortality
  • Parity
  • Population
  • Population Dynamics
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Complications
  • Western Asia

Abstract

Despite scientific advances in obstetrics, maternal mortality is still a serious problem in many countries. This paper analyzes the causes of maternal mortality in Kaplan Hospital since its opening in 1954 up to 1976. 27 women died during this period; total number of deliveries was 63,997. The period was divided into 3: 1954-61, with a mean number of deliveries of 2386 per year; 1962-71, with a mean number of deliveries of 2308 per year; and 1972-76, with a mean number of deliveries of 4244/year. Maternal mortality for the 1st period was 4.9/10,000; in the 2nd, 4.3/10,000 and in the last, 3.0/10,000. Confidence limits based on the Poisson distribution method was used to test for statistical significance. Causes of direct maternal death included: 1) vascular accidents (amniotic fluid embolism and disseminated intravascular clotting) which accounted for almost 1/3 of all cases; 2) infection; 3) EPH gestosis or toxemia of pregnancy; 4) hemorrhage; and 5) anesthesia. Indirect causes of death included cardiac cases, followed by pulmonary embolism, cerebrovascular andirenal diseases, in decreasing order of importance. Older age and parity did not affect incidence of obstetric deaths. This report indicates a definite decline in maternal mortality for the 3 periods. The decline was attributed to liberal use of better antibiotics, emphasis on aseptic techniques, better antenatal care and well-equipped operating theaters. Nevertheless, vascular accidents remain the major direct cause of maternal deaths. Further research should be done on vascular accidents and its prevention; a healthy respect for the use of ceasarian sections may also be helpful in reducing further maternal deaths.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments