Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Maternal high-fat diet is associated with impaired fetal lung development.

Authors
  • Mayor, Reina S1
  • Finch, Katelyn E2
  • Zehr, Jordan2
  • Morselli, Eugenia2
  • Neinast, Michael D2
  • Frank, Aaron P2
  • Hahner, Lisa D2
  • Wang, Jason3
  • Rakheja, Dinesh3
  • Palmer, Biff F2
  • Rosenfeld, Charles R1
  • Savani, Rashmin C1
  • Clegg, Deborah J4
  • 1 Center for Pulmonary and Vascular Biology and Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas;
  • 2 Touchstone Diabetes Center, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; and.
  • 3 Department of Pathology and Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.
  • 4 Touchstone Diabetes Center, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; and [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
AJP Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Publisher
American Physiological Society
Publication Date
Aug 15, 2015
Volume
309
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1152/ajplung.00105.2015
PMID: 26092997
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Maternal nutrition has a profound long-term impact on infant health. Poor maternal nutrition influences placental development and fetal growth, resulting in low birth weight, which is strongly associated with the risk of developing chronic diseases, including heart disease, hypertension, asthma, and type 2 diabetes, later in life. Few studies have delineated the mechanisms by which maternal nutrition affects fetal lung development. Here, we report that maternal exposure to a diet high in fat (HFD) causes placental inflammation, resulting in placental insufficiency, fetal growth restriction (FGR), and inhibition of fetal lung development. Notably, pre- and postnatal exposure to maternal HFD also results in persistent alveolar simplification in the postnatal period. Our novel findings provide a strong association between maternal diet and fetal lung development.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times