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Maternal hepatitis B or C status and the long-term risk of gastrointestinal morbidity for offspring: A population-based cohort study.

Authors
  • Yoles, Israel1, 2
  • Sheiner, Eyal2
  • Abu-Freha, Naim3
  • Wainstock, Tamar4
  • 1 The Central District, Clalit Health Services, Rishon Le Tzion, Israel. , (Israel)
  • 2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. , (Israel)
  • 3 Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. , (Israel)
  • 4 Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. , (Israel)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Liver international : official journal of the International Association for the Study of the Liver
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2019
Volume
39
Issue
11
Pages
2046–2051
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/liv.14193
PMID: 31319010
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

More than 360 million people have chronic hepatitis B or C (HBV/HCV) infection worldwide, many of which are women at childbearing age. While the risk of perinatal HBV/HCV has been well established, the long-term implications on offspring health, have been less studied. We aimed to evaluate the association between maternal HBV/HCV carrier status and long-term gastrointestinal (GI) morbidities in offspring. A population-based cohort analysis compared the risk for long-term childhood GI morbidities in children born to HBV/HCV carrier mothers vs the risk in those who were born to noncarriers. Childhood GI morbidities were predefined based on ICD-9 codes, as recorded in hospital medical files. Children with congenital malformations and multiple gestations were excluded from the analysis. A Kaplan-Meier survival curve was constructed to compare the cumulative GI morbidities over time, and a Cox proportional hazards model was used to control for confounders. During the study period (1991-2014), 242 342 newborns met the inclusion criteria: 771 (0.3%) were born to HBV/HCV mothers and 241 571 (99.7%) were not. The median follow-up was 10.51 years (0-18 years). Offspring to HBV/HCV mothers had a higher incidence of GI diseases (9.3% vs 5.4%, OR = 1.82; 95% CI 1.43-2.32; Kaplan-Meier log-rank = 0.001). The increased risk remained significant in the Cox proportional hazards models, which adjusted for gestational age, mode of delivery and pregnancy complications (adjusted HR = 2.26, 95% CI: 1.79-2.85; P < .001). Maternal HBV or HCV carrier status is an independent risk factor for long-term the GI morbidity of offspring. © 2019 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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