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There’s more to food store choice than proximity: a questionnaire development study

Authors
  • Krukowski, Rebecca A1
  • Sparks, Carla2
  • DiCarlo, Marisha3
  • McSweeney, Jean4
  • West, Delia Smith3
  • 1 University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Preventive Medicine, 66 N. Pauline St, Memphis, TN, USA , Memphis (United States)
  • 2 Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Office of Community Based Public Health, 4301 W. Markham St. #820, Little Rock, AR, USA , Little Rock (United States)
  • 3 University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health, 4301 W. Markham St. #820, Little Rock, AR, USA , Little Rock (United States)
  • 4 University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Nursing, 4301 W. Markham St. #529, Little Rock, AR, USA , Little Rock (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMC Public Health
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Jun 17, 2013
Volume
13
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-586
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

BackgroundProximity of food stores is associated with dietary intake and obesity; however, individuals frequently shop at stores that are not the most proximal. Little is known about other factors that influence food store choice. The current research describes the development of the Food Store Selection Questionnaire (FSSQ) and describes preliminary results of field testing the questionnaire.MethodsDevelopment of the FSSQ involved a multidisciplinary literature review, qualitative analysis of focus group transcripts, and expert and community reviews. Field testing consisted of 100 primary household food shoppers (93% female, 64% African American), in rural and urban Arkansas communities, rating FSSQ items as to their importance in store choice and indicating their top two reasons. After eliminating 14 items due to low mean importance scores and high correlations with other items, the final FSSQ questionnaire consists of 49 items.ResultsItems rated highest in importance were: meat freshness; store maintenance; store cleanliness; meat varieties; and store safety. Items most commonly rated as top reasons were: low prices; proximity to home; fruit/vegetable freshness; fruit/vegetable variety; and store cleanliness.ConclusionsThe FSSQ is a comprehensive questionnaire for detailing key reasons in food store choice. Although proximity to home was a consideration for participants, there were clearly other key factors in their choice of a food store. Understanding the relative importance of these different dimensions driving food store choice in specific communities may be beneficial in informing policies and programs designed to support healthy dietary intake and obesity prevention.

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