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Maintaining motivation and health among recreational runners: Panel study of factors associated with self-rated performance outcomes at competitions.

Authors
  • Gauffin, Håkan1
  • Tillander, Bo2
  • Dahlström, Örjan3
  • Lyth, Johan4
  • Raysmith, Ben5
  • Jacobsson, Jenny5
  • Timpka, Toomas5
  • 1 Athletics Research Center, Linköping University, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Linköping University, Sweden. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Sweden)
  • 2 Athletics Research Center, Linköping University, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Linköping University, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 3 Athletics Research Center, Linköping University, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 4 Athletics Research Center, Linköping University, Sweden; Research and Development Unit in Region Östergötland, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 5 Athletics Research Center, Linköping University, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of science and medicine in sport
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2019
Volume
22
Issue
12
Pages
1319–1323
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.07.004
PMID: 31383548
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To investigate health-related factors associated with self-rated race performance outcomes among recreational long-distance runners. Panel study. Data were collected from runners one month before and after a community-level race event including distances from 8 to 42.2 km. The primary outcome measure was self-rated race performance outcome. The explanatory variables represented health complaints suffered during the build-up year, the pre-race month, and the race and among full marathon runners predicted objective performance outcome (mean pace equal to training pace or faster). Multiple logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with the self-rated performance outcome. Two-hundred forty-five runners (29%) provided complete data sets. Seventy-four percent of the runners reached their desired race performance outcome. Achievement of the performance outcome was more likely when having avoided illness during the build-up and pre-race periods (OR = 3.8; 95% CI:1.8-8.0, p < 0.001), having avoided per-race injury (OR=3.0; 95% CI:1.2-7.4, p = 0.02) and avoided per-race illness (OR = 4.1; 95% CI:1.3-15, p = 0.020). Having obtained the self-rated performance outcome was also associated with running a shorter distance (OR=3.6; 95% CI: 1.7-8.0, p = 0.001) and being younger than 50 years of age (OR = 2.4; 95% CI:1.1-5.3-8.3, p = 0.03). Having met the predicted objective performance outcome predisposed marathon runners to also obtain the self-rated performance outcome (OR = 4.7, 95% CI: 1.5-16, p < 0.01). Having avoided illness during build-up and pre-race was positively associated with self-rated race performance outcome among recreational runners. Adjusting the desired performance outcomes with regard to recent illness and age may help recreational runners to more often achieve their goals and thereby prevent them from leaving the sport. Copyright © 2019 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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