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Lymphoma models for B cell activation and tolerance. VI. Reversal of anti-Ig-mediated negative signaling by T cell-derived lymphokines.

Authors
  • Scott, D W
  • O'Garra, A
  • Warren, D
  • Klaus, G G
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)
Publication Date
Dec 15, 1987
Volume
139
Issue
12
Pages
3924–3929
Identifiers
PMID: 3500976
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We have recently described three "immature" B cell lymphomas which are exquisitely sensitive to growth inhibition by anti-Ig reagents and may serve as models for tolerance induction in normal B cells. These cells are inhibited from cell cycle progression into S after receiving a negative signal in early G1. In this paper, we demonstrate that the growth inhibition by anti-Ig can be prevented and reversed by the addition of supernatants from T cell lines. One such line, called Tova, produces factors which restore normal levels of DNA synthesis in the presence of concentrations of anti-Fab or anti-kappa immunoglobulins which cause up to a 90% inhibition of thymidine incorporation in a 2- to 3-day culture period. This factor is at least partially effective when added up to 24 hr after anti-Ig to unsynchronized lymphoma cells and it does not alter the growth of control cultures. Studies using synchronized lymphoma cells indicated that the T cell factor permitted cycle progression into S when added during the early G1 exposure to anti-kappa and was less effective when added late in G1. Preliminary characterization suggests that both B cell growth factor II (interleukin 5) and B cell stimulatory factor 1 (interleukin 4) have additive activity in this system, although another unidentified lymphokine may also be involved. The relevance of T cell reversal of Ig receptor-mediated negative signaling to neonatal B cell tolerance is emphasized.

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