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Power Spectral Differences between Transient Epileptic and Global Amnesia: An eLORETA Quantitative EEG Study.

Authors
  • Lanzone, Jacopo1
  • Imperatori, Claudio2
  • Assenza, Giovanni1
  • Ricci, Lorenzo1
  • Farina, Benedetto2
  • Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo1
  • Tombini, Mario1
  • 1 Neurology, Neurophysiology and Neurobiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, 00128 Rome, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 2 Cognitive and Clinical Psychology Laboratory, Department of Human Sciences, European University of Rome, Via degli Aldobrandeschi 190, 00163 Rome, Italy. , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brain Sciences
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Sep 06, 2020
Volume
10
Issue
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/brainsci10090613
PMID: 32899970
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is a rare epileptic condition, often confused with transient global amnesia (TGA). In a real-life scenario, differential diagnosis between these two conditions can be hard. In this study we use power spectral analysis empowered by exact Low Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography (eLORETA) to evidence the differences between TEA and TGA. Fifteen patients affected by TEA (64.2 ± 5.2 y.o.; 11 female/4 male; 10 left and 5 right temporal epileptic focus) and 15 patients affected by TGA (65.8 ± 7.2 y.o.; 11 females/4 males) were retrospectively identified in our clinical records. All patients recorded EEGs after symptoms offset. EEGs were analyzed with eLORETA to evidence power spectral contrast between the two conditions. We used an inverse problem solution to localize the source of spectral differences. We found a significant increase in beta band power over the affected hemisphere of TEA patients. Significant results corresponded to the uncus and para-hippocampal gyrus, respectively Brodmann's Areas: 36, 35, 28, 34. We present original evidence of an increase in beta power in the affected hemisphere (AH) of TEA as compared to TGA. These differences involve key areas of the memory network located in the mesial temporal lobe. Spectral asymmetries could be used in the future to recognize cases of amnesia with a high risk of epilepsy.

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