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Low dietary protein and high carbohydrate infant formula affects the microbial ecology of the large intestine in neonatal rats.

Authors
  • Fan, Wenguang1
  • Ren, Haiwei1
  • Cao, Yingying1
  • Wang, Yonggang1
  • Huo, Guicheng2
  • 1 a School of Life Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 2 b College of Food Science, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, 150030, People's Republic of China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Canadian Journal of Microbiology
Publisher
Canadian Science Publishing
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2017
Volume
63
Issue
12
Pages
951–960
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1139/cjm-2017-0242
PMID: 28934589
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a low dietary protein and high carbohydrate infant formula on the large intestine of neonatal rats. A total of 24 neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (14-days-old) were randomly assigned to the low protein, high carbohydrate infant formula-fed group (I group) and a human breast milk-fed group (H group). After 7 days, we selected 6 rats at random from each group to study. No significantly different microbial colonization patterns were observed in the 2 groups at the phylum level. At the family level, Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroidaceae were the dominant bacteria in I and H rats. While Bacteroides was the most abundant bacteria at the genus level, no significant difference was observed between the 2 groups. Methanoic acid, acetate, and butyrate increased in concentration in the I group compared with the H group. Protease activities, ammonia, and indole in the large intestine were lower in I rats than H rats. A significant increase in the expression of GADPH and decrease in the expression of aquaporin 8, aminopeptidase A, cathepsin F precursor, and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase FAF-Y were observed in I rats compared with H rats. These results suggest that a low protein diet could modulate the microbial ecology in the large intestine of neonatal rats.

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