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"Look, Your Muscles Are Firing!": A Qualitative Study of Clinician Perspectives on the Use of Surface Electromyography in Neurorehabilitation.

Authors
  • Feldner, Heather A1
  • Howell, Darrin2
  • Kelly, Valerie E3
  • McCoy, Sarah Westcott3
  • Steele, Katherine M2
  • 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
  • 3 Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2019
Volume
100
Issue
4
Pages
663–675
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2018.09.120
PMID: 30392855
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To examine the perceived value, benefits, drawbacks, and ideas for technology development and implementation of surface electromyography recordings in neurologic rehabilitation practice from clinical stakeholder perspectives. A qualitative, phenomenological study was conducted. In-depth, semistructured interviews and focus groups were completed. Sessions included questions about clinician perspectives and demonstrations of surface electromyography systems to garner perceptions of specific system features. The study was conducted at hospital systems in a large metropolitan area. Adult and pediatric physical therapists, occupational therapists, and physiatrists from inpatient, outpatient, and research settings (N=22) took part in the study. Not applicable. Interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, then coded for analysis into themes. Four major themes emerged: (1) low-tech clinical practice and future directions for rehabilitation; (2) barriers to surface electromyography uptake and potential solutions; (3) benefits of surface electromyography for targeted populations; and (4) essential features of surface electromyography systems. Surface electromyography systems were not routinely utilized for assessment or intervention following neurologic injury. Despite recognition of potential clinical benefits of surface electromyography use, clinicians identified limited time and resources as key barriers to implementation. Perspectives on design and surface electromyography system features indicated the need for streamlined, intuitive, and clinically effective applications. Further research is needed to determine feasibility and clinical relevance of surface electromyography in rehabilitation intervention. Copyright © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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