Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Long-term sub second-response monitoring of gaseous ammonia in ambient air by positive inhaling ion mobility spectrometry.

Authors
  • Huang, Wei1
  • Wang, Weiguo1
  • Chen, Chuang1
  • Li, Mei2
  • Peng, Liying2
  • Li, Hang3
  • Liu, Jiwei4
  • Hou, Keyong1
  • Li, Haiyang5
  • 1 Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 2 Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, People's Republic of China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 3 Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Key Laboratory of Environmental Optics and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, People's Republic of China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 4 Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, People's Republic of China; Liaoning Normal University, Dalian 116029, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 5 Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Talanta
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2017
Volume
175
Pages
522–527
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.talanta.2017.07.076
PMID: 28842027
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

A real-time dynamic measurements of ammonia (NH3) is crucial for understanding the atmospheric nucleation process. A novel method was developed for on line monitoring at the sub-second time scale for the gaseous ammonia in ambient air for months, based on a positive inhaling ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with a 63Ni ion source. The selective detection of NH3 was achieved using a high resolution IMS with an optimization of the drift tube temperature above 150°C. This method improved the peak-to-peak resolution significantly, thus avoided the interferences of the adjacent peaks to the quantitative analysis of NH3. The time resolution of the IMS was less than 0.1s at a data averaging of 10 times. The limit of detection (LOD) achieved at sub-ppb level while a linear response of peak intensity versus concentration of NH3 in the range of 10-60ppb and 60-400ppb were obtained. The relative standard deviations (RSD), the confidence level and the errors were 1.06%, 95% and ± 0.21ppb by measuring 100ppb NH3 for 100 times. The effect of ambient humidity could be greatly reduced by using the drift temperature of over 150°C. At last, the application of measuring the NH3 concentration evolutions of Dalian city was performed from June 19 to December 3 in 2015. The results illustrated a potential method of using IMS for a real-time measuring atmospheric NH3 at an unprecedented accuracy and sensitivity with long-term stability.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times