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Long-term dietary flavonoid intake and risk of Alzheimer disease and related dementias in the Framingham Offspring Cohort

Authors
  • Shishtar, Esra1, 2
  • Rogers, Gail T1
  • Blumberg, Jeffrey B2
  • Au, Rhoda3, 4, 5, 6, 7
  • Jacques, Paul F1, 2
  • 1 Nutritional Epidemiology Program, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, USA , (United States)
  • 2 The Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, USA , (United States)
  • 3 The Framingham Heart Study, Boston University School of Medicine, USA , (United States)
  • 4 Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, USA , (United States)
  • 5 Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, USA , (United States)
  • 6 Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, USA , (United States)
  • 7 Boston University Alzheimer's Disease Center, USA , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Apr 22, 2020
Volume
112
Issue
2
Pages
343–353
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/nqaa079
PMID: 32320019
PMCID: PMC7398772
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

As the older population continues to grow in the US so does the burden imposed on the health care system due to the rise in the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD), representing one of the greatest challenges facing the public health. To date, there are no effective treatments for ADRD and thus identifying dietary strategies that would help prevent or mitigate ADRD is of great priority. Evidence on the role of flavonoids, natural pigments found in a wide range of plant-based foods, in ADRD risk is inconsistent due to the many limitations associated with the current studies. Accordingly, this study aimed to more accurately explore the relationship between total and the six classes of flavonoids and risk of ADRD while taking into account the limitations of previous studies. We found that individuals with higher intakes of the three flavonoid classes: flavonols, anthocyanins, and flavonoid polymers had a lower risk of ADRD compared to those with lower intakes. Our results add to the limited evidence that flavonoids could have the potential to reduce the risk of ADRD.

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