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Longitudinal Study of Headache Trajectories in the Year After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Relation to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms.

Authors
  • Sawyer, Kathryn1
  • Bell, Kathleen R2
  • Ehde, Dawn M3
  • Temkin, Nancy4
  • Dikmen, Sureyya5
  • Williams, Rhonda M6
  • Dillworth, Tiara3
  • Hoffman, Jeanne M3
  • 1 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Texas Southwest Medical Center, Dallas, TX.
  • 3 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
  • 4 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
  • 5 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
  • 6 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Healthcare System, Seattle, WA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2015
Volume
96
Issue
11
Pages
2000–2006
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.07.006
PMID: 26220236
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Headache is common in the year after MTBI, with younger people, persons who previously had headaches, and persons with PTSD more likely to report chronic or worsening headache. Further research is needed to examine whether PTSD symptoms exacerbate headaches or whether problematic headache symptoms exacerbate PTSD.

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