Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Longitudinal evaluation of periodontitis and tooth loss among older adults.

Authors
  • Nilsson, Helena1
  • Sanmartin Berglund, Johan2, 3
  • Renvert, Stefan2, 4, 5, 6
  • 1 Maxillofacial Unit, Halland Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 4 Faculty of Health, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 5 School of Dental Science, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. , (Ireland)
  • 6 Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal Of Clinical Periodontology
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
46
Issue
10
Pages
1041–1049
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jcpe.13167
PMID: 31294471
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To evaluate pattern of change in periodontal variables and tooth loss in a twelve-year follow-up study of older adults living in Sweden. In a prospective population study of older adults, a clinical examination and radiographic dental examination were performed at baseline (2001-2003) and after 12 years (2013-2015). In 375 individuals, the number and proportion of sites with a distance ≥4 mm and ≥5 mm from cemento-enamel junction to the bone level, the number and proportion of teeth with pockets ≥5 mm and number of teeth lost were calculated. Dental caries was registered. Periodontitis was defined as having ≥2 sites with ≥5 mm distance from cemento-enamel junction to the marginal bone level and ≥1 tooth with pockets ≥5 mm. A diagnosis of periodontitis was evident in 39% of the individuals, and 23% of the individuals lost ≥3 teeth over the study period. The proportion of sites with ≥4 mm and ≥5 mm bone loss increased with age, while the proportion of teeth with pockets remained stable. Periodontitis was the strongest predictor for losing ≥3 teeth, OR 2.9 (p < .001) in the final model. Periodontitis is a risk factor for future tooth loss among older adults. © 2019 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times