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Longitudinal changes of serum lipid and apoB levels in a newborn-infant cohort.

Authors
  • Srinivasan, S R
  • Sharma, C
  • Foster, T A
  • Berenson, G S
Type
Published Article
Journal
Metabolism
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Feb 01, 1982
Volume
31
Issue
2
Pages
167–171
Identifiers
PMID: 6952063
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Longitudinal changes in serum apoB levels in relation to serum lipid levels were determined in a subset (n = 30) of a newborn-infant cohort selected from infants (n = 440) of Bogalusa, Louisiana who were born between January 1, 1974 and June 30, 1975. Serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, beta + pre-beta-lipoprotein cholesterol and apoB levels were measured at birth, 6 mo, 1 yr, 2 yr, and 3 yr of age. The mean +/- SD, mg/dl, levels of these variables increased dramatically (p less than 0.0005) from birth to 6 mo (Total cholesterol: 65.0 +/- 15.7 versus 136.3 +/- 27.4; triglycerides: 32.9 +/- 18.9 versus 82.3 +/- 28.9; beta + pre-beta-lipoprotein cholesterol: 31.8 +/- 9.1 versus 87.3 +/- 25.7; apoB: 20.8 +/- 5.3 versus 49.0 +/- 13.5). On the other hand, the ratio of apoB to beta + pre-beta-lipoprotein cholesterol at birth was significantly higher than at 6 months of age (0.69 +/- 0.24 versus 0.58 +/- 0.12, p less than 0.0005). None of the variables changed significantly between 6 mo and 3 yr of age except the increase in serum total cholesterol level from yr 2 to yr 3 (142.6 +/- 26.6 versus 156.4 +/- 23,0, p less than 0.01). A high intra-child year to year correlation for serum apoB was noted beginning at 6 mo of age (r = 0.67, p less than 0.0001); while the apoB levels were proportional to beta + pre-beta-lipoprotein cholesterol levels in some children, others had varied levels of apoB in relation to cholesterol carried by this apoprotein. The fact that apoB levels persist beginning at 6 mo of age and that we are beginning to observe interindividual differences in levels of cholesterol carried by this apoprotein may have clinical implications for coronary artery disease.

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