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The Longitudinal Associations of Perceived Neighborhood Disorder and Lack of Social Cohesion With Depression Among Adults Aged 50 Years or Older: An Individual-Participant-Data Meta-Analysis From 16 High-Income Countries.

Authors
  • Baranyi, Gergő1
  • Sieber, Stefan2
  • Cullati, Stéphane2, 3
  • Pearce, Jamie R1
  • Dibben, Chris J L1
  • Courvoisier, Delphine S3
  • 1 Center for Research on Environment, Society and Health, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 2 Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research "LIVES-Overcoming Vulnerability: Life Course Perspectives," Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Gerontology and Vulnerability, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
  • 3 Department of Readaptation and Geriatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal of epidemiology
Publication Date
Apr 02, 2020
Volume
189
Issue
4
Pages
343–353
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwz209
PMID: 31573028
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Although residential environment might be an important predictor of depression among older adults, systematic reviews point to a lack of longitudinal investigations, and the generalizability of the findings is limited to a few countries. We used longitudinal data collected between 2012 and 2017 in 3 surveys including 15 European countries and the United States and comprising 32,531 adults aged 50 years or older. The risk of depression according to perceived neighborhood disorder and lack of social cohesion was estimated using 2-stage individual-participant-data meta-analysis; country-specific parameters were analyzed by meta-regression. We conducted additional analyses on retired individuals. Neighborhood disorder (odds ratio (OR) = 1.25) and lack of social cohesion (OR = 1.76) were significantly associated with depression in the fully adjusted models. In retirement, the risk of depression was even higher (neighborhood disorder: OR = 1.35; lack of social cohesion: OR = 1.93). Heterogeneity across countries was low and was significantly reduced by the addition of country-level data on income inequality and population density. Perceived neighborhood problems increased the overall risk of depression among adults aged 50 years or older. Policies, especially in countries with stronger links between neighborhood and depression, should focus on improving the physical environment and supporting social ties in communities, which can reduce depression and contribute to healthy aging. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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